talk

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See also: Talk

English language.svg Tok Inglis

English Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia en

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English talken, talkien, from Old English tealcian (to talk, chat), from Proto-Germanic *talkōną (to talk, chatter), frequentative form of Proto-Germanic *talōną (to count, recount, tell), from Proto-Indo-European *dol-, *del- (to aim, calculate, adjust, count), equivalent to tell + -k. Cognate with Scots talk (to talk), Low German taalken (to talk). Related also to Danish tale (to talk, speak), Swedish tala (to talk, speak, say, chatter), Icelandic tala (to talk), Old English talian (to count, calculate, reckon, account, consider, think, esteem, value; argue; tell, relate; impute, assign). More at tale. Despite the surface similarity, unrelated to Templet:noncog, which is the source of loquacious.

Alternative forms

Verb

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  1. (intransitive) To communicate, usually by means of speech.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act TEMPLET:A2R, scene templet:a2r], page 166:
      I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat with you.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, in Mr. Pratt's Patients, page 99:
      Then he commenced to talk, really talk. and inside of two flaps of a herring's fin he had me mesmerized, like Eben Holt's boy at the town hall show. He talked about the ills of humanity, and the glories of health and Nature and service and land knows what all. [] It was a chance he was offering me, a wonderful, eighteen carat, solid gold chance.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      Mr. Campion appeared suitably impressed and she warmed to him. He was very easy to talk to with those long clown lines in his pale face, a natural goon, born rather too early she suspected.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Let’s go to my office and talk. ― I like to talk with you, Ms. Weaver.
      (file)
    Let's sit down and talk.
    Although I don't speak Chinese I managed to talk with the villagers using signs and gestures.
  2. (transitive, informal) To discuss; to talk about.
    They sat down to talk business.
    That's enough about work, let's talk holidays!
  3. (transitive) To speak (a certain language).
    We talk French sometimes.
  4. (transitive, informal, chiefly used in progressive tenses) Used to emphasise the importance, size, complexity etc. of the thing mentioned.
    Are you interested in the job? They're talking big money.
    We're not talking rocket science here: it should be easy.
  5. (intransitive, slang) To confess, especially implicating others.
    Suppose he talks?
    She can be relied upon not to talk.
    They tried to make me talk.
  6. (intransitive) To criticize someone for something of which one is guilty oneself.
    I am not the one to talk.
    She is a fine one to talk.
    You should talk.
    Look who's talking.
  7. (intransitive) To gossip; to create scandal.
    People will talk.
    Aren't you afraid the neighbours will talk?
  8. (informal, chiefly used in progressive tenses) To influence someone to express something, especially a particular stance or viewpoint or in a particular manner.
    You're only sticking up for her because you like her; that's your penis talking.
    That's not like you at all, Jared. The drugs are talking. Snap out of it!
Conjugation

See also: talkest, talketh

Synonyms
Coordinate terms
Derived terms
Terms derived from talk (verb)
Translations

Templet:trans-see

Etymology 2

From Middle English talk, talke (conversation; discourse), from the verb (see above).

Noun

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  1. A conversation or discussion; usually serious, but informal.
    We need to have a talk about your homework.
  2. A lecture.
    There is a talk on Shakespeare tonight.
  3. (uncountable) Gossip; rumour.
    There's been talk lately about the two of them.
  4. (preceded by the; often qualified by a following of) A major topic of social discussion.
    She is the talk of the day.
    The musical is the talk of the town.
  5. (preceded by the) A customary conversation by parent(s) or guardian(s) with their (often teenaged) child about a reality of life; in particular:
    1. A customary conversation in which parent(s) explain sexual intercourse to their child.
      Have you had the talk with Jay yet?
    2. (US) A customary conversation in which the parent(s) of a black child explain the racism and violence they may face, especially when interacting with police, and strategies to manage it.
      • 2012, Crystal McCrary, Inspiration: Profiles of Black Women Changing Our World →ISBN:
        Later, I made sure to have the talk with my son about being a black boy, []
      • 2016, Jim Wallis, America's Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge →ISBN:
        The Talk
        All the black parents I have ever spoken to have had “the talk” with their sons and daughters. “The talk” is a conversation about how to behave and not to behave with police.
      • 2016, Stuart Scott, Larry Platt, Every Day I Fight →ISBN, page 36:
        Now, I was a black man in the South, and my folks had had “the talk” with me. No, not the one about the birds and bees. This one is about the black man and the police.
  6. (uncountable, not preceded by an article) Empty boasting, promises or claims.
    The party leader's speech was all talk.
  7. (usually in the plural) Meeting to discuss a particular matter.
    The leaders of the G8 nations are currently in talks over nuclear weapons.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Terms derived from talk (noun)
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Related terms

Pages starting with “talk”.


Danish

Etymology

Via Frens talc or Jeman Talk, from Persian طلق‎ (talq).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talk/, [tˢalˀɡ̊]

Noun

talk Lua error in Module:utilities at line 94: Language code has not been specified. Please pass parameter 1 to the template.. (singular definite Templet:slink, not used in plural form)[[Category:Templet:da nouns|talk]]

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Related terms


Dutch

Templet:nl Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Noun

Templet:nl-noun

  1. talc (soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch talch, from Old Dutch *talg, from Proto-Germanic *talgaz. More at Inglis tallow.

Noun

Templet:nl-noun

  1. Alternative form of talg (tallow)
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: talk

Anagrams


Polish

Templet:wp

Etymology

From Medieval Latin talcum.

Pronunciation

Templet:pl-p

Noun

talk m inan

  1. (mineralogy) talc
  2. talc, talcum powder

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • talk in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • talk in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Noun

talk Lua error in Module:utilities at line 94: Language code has not been specified. Please pass parameter 1 to the template.. [[Category:Templet:sv nouns|talk]]

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension

Templet:sv-noun-unc-irreg-c